Sarah Carr

Sarah Carr

Youth participation in sport in the Casey electorate will receive a major boost thanks to funding from the Turnbull Government’s Stronger Communities Grants programme, Federal Member for Casey Tony Smith MP has announced.

This programme provides funding for small-scale local infrastructure projects, ranging from $5,000 to $20,000, which are matched dollar for dollar.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (16:48): It is an honour and a privilege, as it has been for other members, to speak on the motion on the 100th anniversary of the landings at Gallipoli. It has been a time when all Australians have remembered, reflected and rededicated themselves to the memory of the first Anzacs. As we move through the four years of the anniversary of the war, we will continue to reflect and remember as the battles at Gallipoli through 1915 shifted to other parts of the Middle East and to the Western Front.

Australia's contribution to the First World War was monumental. From a population of just under five million, 400,000 joined up. One hundred and sixty thousand were wounded and 61,000 were killed. Forty per cent of all eligible men joined up. I mention those statistics because they tell so much of the story, but not all of it. They tell us that every community, every family, in every corner of our country was affected. But it is only when you look into the histories at the local level, as we have been doing in our local electorates, to the names of those 61,000 who lost their lives, that you can comprehend fully the effect on the families and the communities 100 years ago and in the years that followed.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (16:48): It is an honour and a privilege, as it has been for other members, to speak on the motion on the 100th anniversary of the landings at Gallipoli. It has been a time when all Australians have remembered, reflected and rededicated themselves to the memory of the first Anzacs. As we move through the four years of the anniversary of the war, we will continue to reflect and remember as the battles at Gallipoli through 1915 shifted to other parts of the Middle East and to the Western Front.

Australia's contribution to the First World War was monumental. From a population of just under five million, 400,000 joined up. One hundred and sixty thousand were wounded and 61,000 were killed. Forty per cent of all eligible men joined up. I mention those statistics because they tell so much of the story, but not all of it. They tell us that every community, every family, in every corner of our country was affected. But it is only when you look into the histories at the local level, as we have been doing in our local electorates, to the names of those 61,000 who lost their lives, that you can comprehend fully the effect on the families and the communities 100 years ago and in the years that followed.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (16:34): I was pleased earlier today to join with many colleagues for the announcement by the Minister for Communications and the parliamentary secretary to him of the important mobile phone black spot program funding. As you, Mr Deputy Speaker, and the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Finance, who is at the table, know, in outer suburban rural and regional electorates, such as those we represent, this is a vitally important issue. I want to speak today about the two communities I have worked very closely with that have received funding for base stations. It is going to make a real difference to mobile phone connectivity.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (10:21): I move:

That this House:

(1) notes that 1 July 2015 marks the 28th anniversary of the introduction of dividend imputation in Australia;

(2) recognises that:

(a) the system of dividend imputation introduced by the Labor Government in the 34th Parliament has been maintained and supported by every Government since;

(b) the system of refunding excess imputation credits for the benefit of low income earners and charities, which was introduced by the Coalition Government in the 39th Parliament, has been maintained and supported by every Government since;

(c)dividend imputation has delivered improved operation of Australia’s capital markets and corporate landscape;

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (16:48): It is an honour and a privilege, as it has been for other members, to speak on the motion on the 100th anniversary of the landings at Gallipoli. It has been a time when all Australians have remembered, reflected and rededicated themselves to the memory of the first Anzacs. As we move through the four years of the anniversary of the war, we will continue to reflect and remember as the battles at Gallipoli through 1915 shifted to other parts of the Middle East and to the Western Front.

Australia's contribution to the First World War was monumental. From a population of just under five million, 400,000 joined up. One hundred and sixty thousand were wounded and 61,000 were killed. Forty per cent of all eligible men joined up. I mention those statistics because they tell so much of the story, but not all of it. They tell us that every community, every family, in every corner of our country was affected. But it is only when you look into the histories at the local level, as we have been doing in our local electorates, to the names of those 61,000 who lost their lives, that you can comprehend fully the effect on the families and the communities 100 years ago and in the years that followed.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (12:41): It is a pleasure to speak on these appropriation bills for the 2015 budget. In doing so, I want to speak about the benefit the budget brings at a national level and also at a local level in the outer eastern suburbs of the Yarra Valley in the electorate of Casey that I have the honour of representing. The budget does a number of beneficial things. It continues the very important task of budget repair and, at the same time, it has critical initiatives to build a stronger economy with more jobs. As the Treasurer outlined on budget night, when this government won office it faced cumulative deficits over the forward four years of $123 billion. That has now been brought down to $82 billion over the next four years. A lot has been achieved. A lot more has to be done, as the Treasurer outlined. As a result of the legacy of net debt left by those opposite, we were borrowing $133 million a day. That is now down to $96 million. We are on the right track. There is more to be done. This is being achieved through choppy waters, with the iron ore price falling far more than anyone anticipated.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (16:28): On behalf of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters I present the committee's report, incorporating dissenting reports, together with a corrigendum to the report on the conduct of the 2013 federal election and matters related there to.

Report made a parliamentary paper in accordance with standing order 39(e).

Mr TONY SMITH: by leave—The loss of 1,370 Senate votes in Western Australia at the 2013 federal election was the greatest failure in the history of the Australian Electoral Commission. It was caused by multiple failures at multiple levels within the AEC. The consequences included the necessity for a re-run election at a cost of over $21 million and unprecedented damage to the reputation of and confidence in the Electoral Commission.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (12:07): I ask leave of the House to make a statement on behalf of the Joint Standing Committee on electoral matters updating the House on two new inquiries the committee will be launching, relating to electoral education and campaigning at polling places.

Leave granted.

Mr TONY SMITH: I would like to update the House on the current work of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters.

As members would be aware, the committee has tabled reports into Senate voting practices, electronic voting options and, on budget day, the final report into the 2013 federal election.

Mr TONY SMITH (Casey) (09:56): Last Friday I visited Kirkbrae Homes in Kilsyth in the heart of the Casey electorate. Kirkbrae Homes is part of the Presbyterian Church of Victoria. It is an aged-care facility that began some 55 years ago on Mount Dandenong Road just at the foot of the Dandenong Ranges. It provides contemporary living for many local older people with a range of care needs from independent retired residents to those in need of higher care. There are currently 200 people residing at Kirkbrae. Last Friday I was able to be there with some of the leadership to turn to the sod on a new development that will see an upgrade and expansion that will become home to 80 more residents.

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